MFx16: Meet Jeremy Jackson

 

Jeremy Jackson
Bachelor of Architecture
Louisiana State University, 2017

What motivated you to study architecture?
My father is an engineer, and ever since I was a kid I wanted to do the same. It wasn't until my last year of high school when a teacher of mine gave a presentation on Louis Kahn's work that I understood I needed to be in an artistic realm. Architecture was the perfect merge between the left and right side of the brain.

What's your design process like?
My design process is highly dependent on early concept collages/models/studies. I find it beneficial to put as much information/ideas as I can into early iterations of drawings and concepts, as abstracting important data from them becomes a necessity. This forces me to find reasoning and potential in multiple ideas, allowing me to siphon out what I find most important.

Concept model in basswood and plaster.

Concept model in basswood and plaster.

Analog or Digital?
The sequence usually finds itself going from analog, to digital, then analog, then to digital once again. I rely on a digital skill set to enhance analog drawings.

Concept Drawing for Incense MIASMA Project.

Concept Drawing for Incense MIASMA Project.

I wish I had designed...
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What is currently your favorite building, park/garden, interior, and installation?

I wish I had designed the Sha Tin hot formed glass tubing sculpture that graces the lobby of a Hong Kong hotel. The sculpture, designed by Nikolas Weinstein Studios, works seamlessly with the existing architecture, transforming the space into something extremely delicate and precise. I find it interesting to work at the 1:1 scale of the installation, building product to learn about the integrity of detail.

What inspires you?
Music becomes inspiration for most of my ventures. I find that architecture as a language is synonymous with the language of music, in that as a field it becomes a universal catalyst, evoking emotion or lack there-of. It is experienced internally, even in public settings. As a side note, Salvador Dali is an all-time favorite artist of mine, and his work constantly inspires me to re-evaluate my interpretation of architecture.
 

What are you listening to lately?
Lately, I have been listening to the weekly radio show "Soulection" that premiers on Soundcloud. Every week has an inspiring collection of music and interviews that range in genre from oldies to instrumental modern production, and is perfect as a background playlist while working.

Salvador Dali Museum

Salvador Dali Museum

Do you have your own research or focus within architecture?
I am not sure you would necessarily call this research, but I find the conversation of sculpture in its relationship to architecture very interesting. I believe that architecture can be perceived as sculpture one may occupy, which greatly influences my design process.